‘The People v. O.J. Simpson’ Composer Mac Quayle & Astrophysicist Adam Frank

Audiences worldwide have been captivated by the unique musical stylings of EMMY and GRAMMY nominated composer, Mac Quayle.  Mac’s music was most recently heard in FX’s record-breaking “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” starring John Travolta and Sarah Paulson, which was celebrated by critics and audiences alike.  Mac received his first EMMY nomination for FX’s hit series, “American Horror Story: Freak Show,” starring Jessica Lange, Kathy Bates and Angela Bassett.  Quayle has written music for over 40 films and television shows, and has accumulated a long list of credits as a music producer, dance re-mixer and multi-instrumentalist.  As a composer, Mac’s haunting music provided the signature sound for “American Horror Story: Hotel,” starring Lady Gaga and Matt Bomer, as well as Fox’s “Scream Queens,” starring Emma Roberts and Jamie Lee Curtis.  Mac also scored the music to USA Network’s Golden Globe winning suspense-thriller “Mr. Robot,” starring Christian Slater and Rami Malek. In addition to Mac’s television work, he has also composed music for a diverse list of feature films and documentaries.  His music for the documentary “Autism in Love” premiered at the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival, and indie thriller “LA Slasher,” starring Mischa Barton premiered at the New York City International Film Festival. Mac’s music as an additional composer for Cliff Martinez can also be heard in HBO’s EMMY-winning “The Normal Heart,” Film District’s Critic’s Choice Award-winning “Drive,” Warner Bros.’ “Contagion” and A24’s “Spring Breakers.”  In 2013, Mac was chosen as one of only six composers to participate in Sundance’s Music and Sound Design Lab at Skywalker Ranch. As a producer, re-mixer and keyboardist, Mac has worked on over 300 releases, 40 #1 Billboard Dance hits, and earned a GRAMMY nomination for producing Donna Summer’s “I Will Go with You.”  Quayle has been awarded numerous Gold and Platinum records, as well as worked with some of the biggest names in the music business.  Mac has created music for Madonna, Whitney Houston, Depeche Mode, Britney Spears, Elvis PresleyAnnie Lennox, New Order, Beyonce and Sting, to name a few. When asked about his career highlights, Mac responded, “I have been very fortunate to work with so many talented people over the years.  However, there is one special moment that stands out for me: Playing ping pong with Peter Gabriel at Real World Studios.” Mac lives, works and plays ping pong in the mountains near Los Angeles.
Adam Frank fell in love with astronomy when he was 5 years old and the affair has never cooled. Late one night in the family library, Adam found the keys to the universe sketched out on the covers of his dad's pulp-science-fiction magazines—astronauts bounding across the jagged frontiers of alien worlds, starships rising to discovery on pillars of fire. The boundless world of possibilities on those covers became the one he was determined to inhabit. Later, the love for astronomy transformed into a passion for the practice of science itself when his father's simple explanation of electric currents and sound waves turned the terror of a booming thunderstorm into an opportunity to marvel at the world's beauty. Now a professor of astrophysics at the University of Rochester, he studies the processes that shape the formation and death of stars and has become a leading expert on the final stages of evolution for stars like the sun. Adam is a theoretical/computational astrophysicist and he heads a research group that is developing new tools for simulating the cosmos. Adam also describes himself as an "evangelist of science." His commitment to showing others the beauty and power of science has led him to a second career as a popular writer and speaker on the subject. He is the co-founder of National Public Radio’s 13.7: Cosmos and Culture blog as well as a regular on-air commentator for All Things Considered. He also contributes occasionally to The New York Times. Adam is the author of two books. The first, The Constant Fire: Beyond the Religion and Science Debate, focuses on perspectives on science and human spirituality that went beyond the usual creationism vs. Richard Dawkins debate. About Time: Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang explores the links between changing conceptions of cosmology and the human experience of time. He is also the author of a textbook Astronomy: At Play in the Cosmos. You can also sign up for his free Coursera course "Confronting The Big Questions: Highlights of Modern Astronomy".
Illustration of the Drake equation
Illustration of the Drake equation
 

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